Homeschool Sports Access Timeline

This listing of sports access bills is not yet complete. If you have a sports access bill we should add to this list, whether for the current legislative session or for a previous session, please email us at research@responsiblehomeschooling.org.

2015 Legislative Session

Arkansas

Senate Bill 331, which would require the Arkansas Activities Association to allow member schools to play homeschool teams, was introduced on February 11th and referred to the education committee. See HB331.

Hawaii

House Bill 468, which would allow homeschooled student to participate in extracurricular activities in the school district they would have attended, was introduced on January 26th and referred to the education and finance committees. See HB468.

Kansas

Senate Bill 60, which will allow homeschooled students to participate in any public school activities, including athletics, was introduced on January 22nd and passed by the senate by a 30-9 vote on February 26th. The bill has been referred to the house education committee. See SB60.

Mississippi

Senate Bill 2329, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in interscholastic extracurricular activities in their local public schools, was introduced on January 19th and referred to the education committee. On February 12th, the senate voted against the bill 31-17. See SB2329.

Missouri

House Bill 232, which would allow homeschooled students to participate in athletics and band at their resident public school, was introduced on January 7th and referred to the elementary and secondary education committee. On March 3rd, the bill passed the elementary and secondary education committee and was referred to the committee on education. See SB232.

Nebraska

Legislature Bill 103, which would allow public schools to require homeschooled students to enroll in no more than one course in order to be eligible to participate in extracurriculars, including athletics, was introduced on January 8th and referred to the education committee. See LB103.

New York

Assembly Bill 3678 and and Senate Bill 2175, which would allow homeschooled students to participate in district interscholastic sports, were introduced on January 27th and January 1st and referred to the assembly and senate education committees. See A3678 and SB2175.

Tennessee

House Bill 545, which would allow students homeschooled through church schools to participate in public school athletics, was introduced on February 10 and referred to the education committee. See HB545.

Texas

House Bill 347 and Senate Bill 391, which would allow homeschooled students to participate in public school athletics, were introduced on November 20, 2014, and January 28, 2015. The bills are currently before the house and senate education committees. See HB347 and SB391.

South Carolina

House Bill 3552, which would require the state athletic association to allow member schools to play homeschool teams, was introduced on February 11th and referred to the education committee. See HB3552.

Virginia

House Bill 1626, which prohibits public schools from joining athletics associations that bar homeschooled students from competing for member schools, was introduced on January 8th and passed the house and senate on January 29th and February 17th. The governor has yet to either sign or veto the bill. See HB1626.

West Virginia

House Bill 2749, which would allow homeschooled students to participate in public school athletics and other extracurriculars, was introduced on February 13th and referred to the education committee. See HB2749.

2014 Legislative Session

Alabama

House Bill 503, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate on public school athletic teams, was introduced on February 18th and referred to the education committee where it was postponed indefinitely. See HB503.

Georgia

House Bill 1149, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate on public school athletic teams, was introduced on March 13th and referred to the education committee, but died in committee. See HB1149.

Mississippi

Senate Bill 2515, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in any extracurricular activities at their local public schools, including athletics and band, was introduced on January 20th and referred to the education committee where it died in committee. See SB2515.

Missouri

House Bill 1347, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in public school athletic activities, was introduced on January 14th and passed the education committee on April 2nd and the rules committee on April 28th. However, the bill was never put up for a vote and subsequently died in the chamber. See HB1347.

New Jersey

Senate Bill 125 was introduced on January 14th and referred to the education committee, and subsequently referred to the budget and appropriations committee on June 9th. Assembly Bill 3430 was introduced on June 23rd and referred to the education committee. These identical bills would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in public school athletics. Both bills failed to progress out of committee. See A3430 and S125.

New York

Senate Bill 1715, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in public school interscholastic sports, was reintroduced and again referred to the education committee, this time on January 8th. The bill died in committee. See SB1715.

Michigan

House Bill 5613, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in any public school extracurricular activities, was introduced on March 29th and referred to the education committee but died in committee. See HB5613.

Virginia

House Bill 63, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in public school athletics, was introduced on December 5th, 2014, and immediately referred to the education committee. The bill passed the house on January 30th, 2015, and was referred to the senate committee on education and health, where it failed to make further progress and ultimately died. See HB63.

West Virginia

House Bill 4230, which would allow homeschooled students to participate in public school athletics, was introduced on January 20th and referred to committee, where it failed to make further progress. See HB4230.

2013 Legislative Session

Arkansas—Passed

House Bill 1789, which opened the door for homeschooled students to participate in athletics and extracurriculars at their resident public school and prevented superintendents from requiring homeschooled athletes to be enrolled in more than one class period per day, was introduced on March 7th and referred to the education committee. The bill passed the house and the senate in April, with only one nay vote, and went into force on April 22nd. See HB1789.

New York

Senate Bill 1715, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in public school interscholastic sports, was referred to the education committee on January 9th. The bill failed to make further progress and died in committee. See SB1715.

Hawaii

House Bill 1050, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in public school extracurriculars, including athletics, was introduced on January 24th and referred to the education and judicial committees. On December 18th, the bill was carried over to the 2014 regular session but made no further progress. See HB1050.

Ohio—Passed

House Bill 59, the state’s omnibus spending bill, was introduced on February 12th and was signed into law on June 30th. Tucked within this bill was a provision requiring school districts to allow homeschooled students to participate in extracurricular activities in their local public schools. See HB59.

Tennessee—Passed

Senate Bill 240, which allowed some homeschooled students to participate in public school athletics, was introduced on January 29th and referred to the education committee on January 31st. The bill passed the senate on March 4th and the house on March 25th and was signed into law by the governor on April 19th. See SB240.

North Carolina

Senate Bill 569, which would have allowed homeschooled students access to public school athletics and other extracurriculars, was introduced on April 1st. The bill was referred to the rules committee on April 2nd, and died in committee. See SB569.

Mississippi

Senate Bill 2129, which would have offered homeschooled students access to public school athletics, was introduced on January 14th and referred to the education committee, where it died in committee. See SB2129.

Indiana—Policy Change

The Indiana High School Athletic Association voted on April 29th to allow homeschooled students who enroll in one public school class to participate in athletics at the school where they are enrolled. This was a change over the previous policy, which allowed only students enrolled full time to participate in athletics governed by the association. See here.

New Jersey

Senate Bill 3043, which would have allowed homeschooled students to participate in interscholastic sports programs in their local school districts, was introduced on November 14th and referred to the education committee. It was referred to the budget and appropriations committee on December 16th, where it died in committee. See S3043.

2012 Legislative Session

Alaska—Passed

Senate Bill 119, which opened public school athletics to students educated at home through the state’s popular correspondence schools, was introduced on April 1, 2011, but did not make progress until March 2012. The bill was passed by the senate and house in April and signed into law in June. The bill did not open sports participation to students educated at home under the state’s homeschool statute, as it only allowed for participation by students educated in “accredited” homeschools, and such accreditation does not exist. See SB119.

South Carolina—Passed

Senate Bill 149, which required school districts to allow homeschooled students to participate in interscholastic activities, including athletics and other extracurriculars, was introduced on January 1, 2011, and referred to the education committee. The bill made no progress until April 2012, when it was approved by the committee and sent to the house. The bill was passed by the house and then the senate in May, and was signed by the governor in June. Each vote was unanimous. See SB149.

2011 Legislative Session

Arkansas

Senate Bill 774, which would have opened public school athletics and other extracurriculars to homeschooled students, was introduced on March 3rd and referred to the education committee. The bill was passed by the senate on March 29th, but died in the house. See SB774.

Rachel Coleman

Rachel Coleman

Dr. Rachel Coleman is the Executive Director of CRHE. She was homeschooled K-12 and is an instructor at Indiana University.
Rachel Coleman