Wisconsin

  • Homeschool statute: Parents must file annually with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction and provide  875 hours of instruction in “a sequentially progressive curriculum of fundamental instruction in reading, language arts, math, social studies, science and health.” There are no parent qualification, bookkeeping, or assessment requirements.

Homeschool Statute

A “home-based private educational program” is limited to one family unit and is defined as “a program of educational instruction provided to a child by the child’s parent or guardian or by a person designated by the parent or guardian.” See Wisconsin Statue 115.01(3g). In general, home-based private educational programs are subject to the same requirements as private schools. See Wis. Stat. Ann. § 118.15(1a, 4), § 115.30(3), and §118.165(1)

Notification: By October 15th of each year, administrators of public schools, private schools, and homeschools are required to notify the Department of Public Instruction of the number of students enrolled in their instructional programs. Homeschool parents and guardians meet this requirement by electronically submitting form PI-1206, which requires them to affirm that the family’s educational program is in compliance with all requirements. Parents or guardians who begin homeschooling in the middle of the school year should submit this form before the date their child ceases attending public school. Authorized personnel at each school district have access to the names of parents or guardians who have filed PI-1206 forms within their district. If a homeschooling family moves to a different school district, or if the number of children enrolled in their homeschool program changes, the parents or guardians are requested to update their PI-1206 form online. See Wis. Stat. Ann. § 115.30(3).
Qualifications: None.
Days or hours: Homeschools are required to provide 875 hours of instruction each year. See Wis. Stat. Ann. § 118.165(1c).
Subjects: Homeschools are required to provide “a sequentially progressive curriculum of fundamental instruction in reading, language arts, math, social studies, science and health.” See Wis. Stat. Ann. § 118.165(1d).
Bookkeeping: None.
Assessment: None.
Intervention: Wisconsin law does not give either the Department of Public Instruction or local education agencies the authority to monitor home-based private educational programs to ensure that they are meeting the requirements outlined here. However, should a complaint be lodged, the local superintendent may ask the homeschool parents or guardians to provide evidence of their compliance with the law.
Other:

Services Available to Homeschooled Students

Part-time enrollment: Yes. School districts are required by law to allow local homeschooled students to take up to two high school classes each semester, provided there is space and provided the homeschooled students meet the requirements for high school admission. Students may take both core and non-core classes; their participation counts toward the district’s equalization aid. While they are not required to do so by law, elementary and middle schools may also offer classes to resident elementary and middle school-aged homeschool students. However, homeschool participation in elementary and middle school classes does not count toward the district’s equalization aid. See Wis. Stat. Ann. § 118.145(4).
Extracurriculars: Yes, at the district’s discretion. However, the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association (WIAA) excludes homeschooled students from participating in school sports under their jurisdiction. For any sports or extracurriculars that are not governed by the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association (WIAA), homeschool participation is up to the discretion of individual school districts.
Special needs: No. While public schools must offer special needs evaluations to all students within their districts regardless of what school they attend or whether they are homeschooled, public schools in Wisconsin have no obligation to provide additional services to homeschooled students with special needs.
Other: n/a

Background:

Early homeschooling families requested permission from the Department of Public Instruction or incorporated as private schools. The Department of Public Instruction was highly critical of homeschooling, but in 1983 the Wisconsin Supreme Court declared in State v. Popanz that the state’s compulsory education law “void for vagueness since it fails to define ‘private school.’” In response, the Wisconsin legislature passed a homeschooling law with minimal requirements the following year. This law remains in force today.

For more, see A History of Homeschooling in Wisconsin.

Resources:

Home-Based Private Instruction Program, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Frequently Asked Questions Relating to Homeschooling, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Wisconsin Law Relating to Home-Based Private Educational Programs (Homeschooling)

Wisconsin, International Center for Home Education Research

This overview is for informational purposes only and does not constitute the giving of legal advice.

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