Kansas Should Strengthen Its Mandatory Reporter Laws

For Immediate Release: Contact with Mandatory Reporters Could Have Saved Homeschooled Adrian Jones Canton, Ma., 5/18/2017—On Tuesday, May 16th, the Kansas House Committee on Federal and State Affairs heard testimony on House Bill 2425, introduced in response to the tragic 2015 death of seven-year-old Adrian Jones of Kansas City. HB … Continue reading

Statement Supporting Kansas’ Senate Bill 60

For Immediate Release: Homeschooled Students Benefit from Extracurricular Access Canton, Ma.—The Kansas State High School Activities Association (KSHSAA) requires student athletes to be students at the school they represent, thus barring homeschooled students from participation. Senate Bill 60 could change this, requiring school districts to permit any student residing in … Continue reading

Jane Morgan: “I was the homeschooled kid who grew up to become a homeschool mom”

“If there had been more regulations on homeschooling in the states in which I lived I would have been more aware of my success or failure as my children’s primary educator. We are taught as homeschoolers to protect our privacy at all costs. But so much stress would have been alleviated with more oversight.” Continue reading

Jerusha Lofland: “Ignorance leaves people vulnerable”

“I support oversight of homeschooling because every child deserves a good education in all subjects. I received a great education in English grammar, and I could recite entire chapters from the Bible. But my parents gave up teaching me basic algebra, my textbooks viewed history through a primarily anti-Catholic lens, I was warned against studying the humanities, and I have spent a decade unlearning much of the “science” I was taught.” Continue reading

Amethyst Marie: “The students most affected … were girls”

“I believe that the education I received through homeschooling was likely better than what I would’ve gotten in my local public school districts. But I can’t say this for all the homeschoolers I grew up with. I knew teenagers who weren’t being given a complete high school education, particularly high school math and science. The students most affected by this were girls.” Continue reading